Can Brooklyn’s New U.S. Attorney Help Restore Confidence In Law Enforcement?

0


In 1999, Mr. Peace became an associate lawyer in the United States, dealing with narcotics, immigration, bank fraud and other cases, including an insurance fraud ring run by a former New Jersey cop.

In early 2000, Mr Peace asked Ms Pokorny to work with him on a case he had indicted – a mortgage fraud scheme carried out by a husband-wife duo, targeting elderly Brooklyn homeowners.

The fraud was not of the magnitude the bureau could generally pursue. “This is really a case that would not have happened without Breon and the agent in charge of the case,” Ms. Pokorny said. The case has been tried.

“He’s an amazing communicator and he’s got a way of talking to people – he’s able to convey sincerity, brilliant delivery that you can’t teach,” she said. Mr. Peace’s summary was “so fabulous,” Ms. Pokorny said, “those very jaded and experienced FBI agents were completely laughing at him.”

Mr. Peace left the U.S. Attorney’s Office in 2002, spent a year teaching a prosecution clinic at NYU Law, then joined Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton as a partner. He became a partner in 2007. He has two children; his wife, Jacqueline Jones-Peace, is a senior lawyer with the nonprofit Equal Justice Initiative.

As with many civil attorneys, much of Mr. Peace’s work at Cleary has been below the surface – the goal, for many corporate clients, is for legal issues to be resolved confidently, with the least amount of effort. ripples possible.

Joon H. Kim, another Cleary partner who served as interim US attorney in Manhattan from 2017 to 2018, said Mr. Peace would bring “a new perspective” to the job. “Breon is someone who has had incredible success as a private lawyer, representing businesses and individuals, and would bring to the workplace a comprehensive and sophisticated understanding of the impact of the decisions he and his office will make,” said he declared.


Share.

Comments are closed.